skip to Main Content

This Week's E-book Bargain!

Download it now for only $1.99

Second Sight is dangerous. Nan’s visions of two noble boys imprisoned in a tower frighten her village priest. The penalty for witchcraft is death.

Despite his warnings, Nan’s determination to save these boys launches her on a nightmare journey. As fifteenth-century England teeters on the edge of civil war, her talent as a Seer draws powerful, ambitious people around her. Not all of them are honourable.

Twists of fate bring her to a ghost-ridden house in Silver Street where she is entrusted with a secret which could destroy a dynasty. Pursued by the unscrupulous Bishop Stillington, she finds refuge with a gypsy wise-woman, until a chance encounter takes her to Middleham Castle. Here she embarks on a passionate affair with Miles Forrest, the Duke of Gloucester’s trusted henchman. But is her lover all he seems?

Coming Soon

wp_wpbooklist_jre_hpcs

4
1
2
3

New Releases

wp_wpbooklist_jre_hpnr

1
2
3
5
4

200th Anniversary of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

The current Historical Novels Review (HNR Issue 85) features Bethany Latham’s cover story, Happy 200th Anniversary, Frankenstein. In her tribute to Mary Shelley’s classic horror novel, first published in 1818, Ms. Latham references several novels based on Shelley’s original, including my Confessions of the Creature. Here’s an excerpt from the article:

“The struggle to achieve or keep humanity, even the very definition of what it means to be human, fascinates authors who tackle Shelley’s work. In Confessions of the Creature(Fireship, 2012) by Gary Inbinder, the creature is given the opportunity for normalcy, starting with his outward appearance. Inbinder notes that it is first “Frankenstein [who] denies the creature’s humanity. As their hatred for each other grows, both creator and creature become less human, more monstrous.” Rejected by his creator from the outset, Shelley’s poor creature was never offered the empathy he perhaps deserved; Inbinder chose to be kinder: “In my sequel, the creature is given the chance of becoming truly human, the person he was meant to be. No longer hideous, the transformed creature sets out on a quest for redemption through love, the love that was denied him in Shelley’s novel.”

Download the full article: Frankenstein

I was honored to have my novel chosen for reference in this fine tribute to a classic. My thanks to Ms. Latham and the HNR!

Best regards,

Gary Inbinder

Award Winners | Five Star Reviews

wp_wpbooklist_jre_hpaw

2
1
3
5
4

Reader Favorites

wp_wpbooklist_jre_hprf

3
1
2
4
5
Back To Top