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One of the most revolutionary tactics in naval warfare was developed in the 18th Century, and was called “Breaking the Line.” The Royal Navy used it to win fleet engagements ranging from the Battle of the Saints, to Trafalgar. But, who developed it?

Years of controversy led to a war of words between supporters of John Clerk of Eldin, Admiral Lord Rodney, and Rodney’s captain-of-the fleet, Sir Charles Douglas. In 1832, the latter’s son, Sir Howard Douglas, set forth the arguments on behalf of his father in his book Naval Evolutions: A Memoir. He assumed it would be the final word on the matter. It was not.

Full of solid evidence, including eyewitness testimony, the book should have laid the issue to rest. Instead, it was largely ignored or dismissed as biased due to the relationship of the author to his subject. But, dismissed or not, the book remains, and the arguments are overwhelming.

Fireship Press is proud to revisit this controversy with the release of a new edition of the book, with an introduction by Christopher Valin, perhaps the world’s leading expert on the life of Sir Charles Douglas.

It’s a book that any serious student of naval history will want to read.

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200th Anniversary of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

The current Historical Novels Review (HNR Issue 85) features Bethany Latham’s cover story, Happy 200th Anniversary, Frankenstein. In her tribute to Mary Shelley’s classic horror novel, first published in 1818, Ms. Latham references several novels based on Shelley’s original, including my Confessions of the Creature. Here’s an excerpt from the article:

“The struggle to achieve or keep humanity, even the very definition of what it means to be human, fascinates authors who tackle Shelley’s work. In Confessions of the Creature(Fireship, 2012) by Gary Inbinder, the creature is given the opportunity for normalcy, starting with his outward appearance. Inbinder notes that it is first “Frankenstein [who] denies the creature’s humanity. As their hatred for each other grows, both creator and creature become less human, more monstrous.” Rejected by his creator from the outset, Shelley’s poor creature was never offered the empathy he perhaps deserved; Inbinder chose to be kinder: “In my sequel, the creature is given the chance of becoming truly human, the person he was meant to be. No longer hideous, the transformed creature sets out on a quest for redemption through love, the love that was denied him in Shelley’s novel.”

Download the full article: Frankenstein

I was honored to have my novel chosen for reference in this fine tribute to a classic. My thanks to Ms. Latham and the HNR!

Best regards,

Gary Inbinder

Award Winners | Five Star Reviews

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